RECOVERY OF LATENT FINGERPRINTS FROM THE INNER SURFACES OF ADHESIVE TAPES: TAPE SEPARATING SOLUTION


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Gülekçi Y. , Tülek A.

INTERNATIONAL KOSOVO CONGRESS ON CULTURE, ARTS AND MULTI-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES, Priştine, Kosovo, 16 - 18 April 2021, pp.89-90

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Summary Text
  • City: Priştine
  • Country: Kosovo
  • Page Numbers: pp.89-90

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Fingerprints are the most widely preferred type of evidence retrieval technique worldwide, which plays an important role in criminal investigations. New and effective methods that can recover appropriate and best visuals from the surfaces of hidden fingerprints that are not visible at the scene or do not contain enough characteristic points are still being investigated.

Biological and trace evidence detected from the adhesive surfaces of the tapes can greatly contribute to the resolution of forensic issues in a short time. Adhesive surfaces are used especially in the creation of bomb assemblies often found in terror and bombing acts, in packaging methods that are used in the transfer of narcotic substances, during tying down of the abducted persons and fixing fake license plates attached to stolen motor vehicles. The value of adhesive surfaces in terms of crime investigations is due to the fact that the adhesive side adhered to the surface is not exposed to the external environment and usually contain fingerprints of the person or persons who committed the act.

One of the most difficult issue is the treatment of the adhesive surfaces for latent fingerprints in adhesive tapes. In this study, two females, two males, totalling to four people, between the ages of 20-30, signed an illuminated consent form on the adhesive inner surfaces of a beige-colored packaging tape and a transparent packaging tape, leaving 160 natural fingerprint samples. After this step, the same-type tapes were stuck on to each other. The “Tape Separating Solution” developed for separating the inner surfaces of adhesive tapes was applied. Latent-fingerprint development was achieved by applying crystal violet and small particle reagent (SPR) to the separated tapes. High quality photo capture and image sharpening were applied to each fingerprint developed and the fingerprints were identified.

It is believed that this study can strongly help crime scene investigators by allowing hidden fingerprints from adhesive surfaces to be recovered without deformation and be detected by fingerprint development methods at a rate of 95%.

Keywords: Adhesive Surfaces, Fingerprint, Crystal Violet, Small Particle Reagent (SPR)