Chronic immobilization stress induces anxiety-related behaviors and affects brain essential minerals in male rats


ŞAHİN Z., Ozkurkculer A., KALKAN Ö. F. , Ozkaya A., Koc A., Koca R. O. , ...More

International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research, vol.92, no.5-6, pp.349-356, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 92 Issue: 5-6
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000682
  • Journal Name: International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts Core, EMBASE, Food Science & Technology Abstracts, MEDLINE, Veterinary Science Database
  • Page Numbers: pp.349-356
  • Keywords: anxiety, brain, depression, Immobilization stress, male rat, mineral
  • Kütahya Health Sciences University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

© 2020 Hogrefe Verlag.Alterations of essential elements in the brain are associated with the pathophysiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders. It is known that chronic/overwhelming stress may cause some anxiety and/or depression. We aimed to investigate the effects of two different chronic immobilization stress protocols on anxiety-related behaviors and brain minerals. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups as follows (n = 10/group): control, immobilization stress-1 (45 minutes daily for 7-day) and immobilization stress-2 (45 minutes twice a day for 7-day). Stress-related behaviors were evaluated by open field test and forced swimming test. In the immobilization stress-1 and immobilization stress-2 groups, percentage of time spent in the central area (6.38 ± 0.41% and 6.28 ± 1.03% respectively, p < 0.05) and rearing frequency (2.75 ± 0.41 and 3.85 ± 0.46, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively) were lower, latency to center area (49.11 ± 5.87 s and 44.92 ± 8.04 s, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively), were higher than the control group (8.65 ± 0.49%, 5.37 ± 0.44 and 15.3 ± 3.32 s, respectively). In the immobilization stress-1 group, zinc (12.65 ± 0.1 ppm, p < 0.001), magnesium (170.4 ± 1.7 ppm, p < 0.005) and phosphate (2.76 ± 0.1 ppm, p < 0.05) levels were lower than the control group (13.87 ± 0.16 ppm, 179.31 ± 1.87 ppm and 3.11 ± 0.06 ppm, respectively). In the immobilization stress-2 group, magnesium (171.56 ± 1.87 ppm, p < 0.05), phosphate (2.44 ± 0.07 ppm, p < 0.001) levels were lower, and manganese (373.68 ± 5.76 ppb, p < 0.001) and copper (2.79 ± 0.15 ppm, p < 0.05) levels were higher than the control group (179.31 ± 1.87 ppm, 3.11 ± 0.06 ppm, 327.25 ± 8.35 ppb and 2.45 ± 0.05 ppm, respectively). Our results indicated that 7-day chronic immobilization stress increased anxiety-related behaviors in both stress groups. Zinc, magnesium, phosphate, copper and manganese levels were affected in the brain.